Depending on the season, you can find local produce in most of the supermarkets in Iceland, but you might have to look for them. Stores like Frú Lauga offer a wider selection of locally grown food but you can also find them in places like Bónus, Krónan, Nettó and Hagkaup.




This is where we went onour trip: 


Rjómabúið Erpsstaðir
The folks at Erpsstaðir run a dairy farm and produce fantastic products on site. We absolutely loved tasting their cheeses, skyr, ice cream, and especially their famous white chocolate skyr candies. Most importantly, we found that Erpsstaðir’s skyr (made the old-fashioned way) makes an excellent, and uniquely Icelandic pizza topping. Erpsstaðir is a must-stop on the way to the Westfjords for dairy treats and a tour of the farm.

www.erpsstadir.is


Norður Salt
The Norður Salt facility is serenely located on a tiny island off the coast of Reykhólar in the Westfjords. Nutrient rich seawater is pumped directly into their factory, where it is evaporated using heat from geothermal spring water, leaving behind delicious sea salt flakes. The salt we picked up during our visit to Norður Salt is an essential part of our pizza recipe, bringing out the rich flavours of our pizza crust and tomato sauce.

www.nordurco.com


Tómas Ponzi
Tómas Ponzi is an absolute tomato-growing master. At his home Brennholt on the outskirts of Mosfellsbær, he is currently working to develop a breed of outdoor tomato plants than can withstand Iceland’s harsh climate. We picked up a load of ‘Boney M’ tomatoes, grown in Tómas’ unheated greenhouse, which make the perfect base for our pizza sauce. Tómas’ heirloom tomatoes, grown in the hothouse, are an exquisite meal in themselves, while placing thick fresh slices of these tomatoes on top of a pizza slice elevates the experience to the ethereal.


Flúðasveppir ehf
Flúðasveppir is a great big operation that organically produces loads and loads of mushrooms. Compost made out of the waste from neighbouring farms provides the base for the white and brown mushrooms grown year-round at Flúðasveppir. Six separate rooms contain mushrooms at different growing stages so that a crop is always ready to harvest. That way, Icelanders are never short on mushrooms as long as these folks are around. We’re sure glad they are around since we love mushrooms on our pizza.

www.islenskt.is/fludasveppir


Skaftholt
Skaftholt is an organic farm where adults with mental disabilities work and live off of the produce from the land. Their greenhouses are full of rich and beautiful vegetables, while chickens, sheep, and cattle roam free over the rest of the property. We visited specifically to have a glimpse of the cheese room where Skaftholtsostur is expertly made, and we were not disappointed. We picked up a chunk of gouda straight from their cheese cave that is the perfect cheese for a pizza topping.

 Skaftholt


Engi
The organic vegetable farm at Engi grows and sells a little of everything. We picked up potted herb plants—basil, oregano, and thyme—that we now keep alive at home and harvest when we need some awesome flavour. Plus, Engi’s spicy chilli peppers give our pizza sauce an exciting kick. There is also no shortage of fresh produce to choose from at Engi’s market—perfect eggplants and sweet red cherries, just to name a couple. Visit Engi on weekends to pick up outstanding produce, or to get lost in their hedge maze!


Ískorn
Ískorn is one of the few operations that dare to grow wheat in Iceland. At Ískorn, a field of wheat lies beside its more commonly grown relatives, rye and barley. After touring the fields, we picked up a sacks of flour made from each of the three grains. We found that an even mixture of their whole-wheat flour and rye flour make an awesome pizza dough. We are currently feeding our own sourdough starter with Ískorn flour so we’re ready to make a pizza at any time!

www.foldvegur.is


S.Helgason steinsmiðja
We got some Icelandic greystone from S.Helgason, a stone processing company located in Kópavogur. The stone is sourced and processed locally and we managed to bake our own Pizza's in a prototype of two stone plates. Our hope is to be able to build an oven that we can easily assemble and move from place to place to come prepare a Pizza near you!

www.shelgason.is


Skógræktarfélag Reykjavíkur
Of course, if we build an oven from Icelandic raw material, we also need to think about the energy source. We made a trip to Heiðmörk and visited Skógræktarfélag Reykjavíkur to get firewood as well as some planks of Icelandic wood to build a nice and long dinner table that fits all our friends.

www.heidmork.is